Around and About Yorkshire and Derbyshire

Peak District
The Peak District

Visit the Peak District – Visit the Peak District and Derbyshire. A world of contrasting natural beauty, with moors and dales, rivers, springs and caverns and at its heart the Peak District National Park, known and loved by millions for its breath-taking views, relaxation, inspiration and adventure. Spanning areas of Derbyshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire and Yorkshire in the heart of England and home to market towns, pretty villages, historic houses, famous attractions and hundreds of traditional events.

Visit Sheffield – Sheffield is Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. It is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group.

Sheffield
Sheffield at night

During the 19th century, Sheffield gained an international reputation for steel production. Many innovations were developed locally, including crucible and stainless steel, fuelling an almost tenfold increase in the population during the Industrial Revolution. Sheffield received its municipal charter in 1843, becoming the City of Sheffield in 1893. International competition in iron and steel caused a decline in traditional local industries during the 1970s and 1980s, coinciding with the collapse of coal mining in the area.

The 21st century has seen extensive redevelopment in Sheffield along with other British cities. The economy has experienced steady growth averaging around 5% annually, greater than that of the broader region of Yorkshire and the Humber.

The city is located within the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin, and the Sheaf. 61% of Sheffield’s entire area is green space, and a third of the city lies within the Peak District national park. There are more than 250 parks, woodlands and gardens in the city, and an estimated 2 million trees, giving Sheffield the highest ratio of trees to people of any city in Europe.

Bolsover Castle – A 15 minute drive from Mount St Mary’s College, With spectacular views over Derbyshire, the fairy-tale Stuart mansion, Bolsover

BOLSOVER CASTLE Aerial view
Bolsover Castle Aerial view

Castle, was designed to entertain and impress. Its reputation for revelry lives on with many events taking place including medieval style jousting on Sunday 30th and Monday 31st August. Wander the lavish rooms of the Little Castle, explore the romantic ruined terrace range, and delight in the views from the wall walk.

The castle was founded in the late 11th century by William Peveril, one of William the Conqueror’s knights, but it was neglected from the mid-14th century. Its ruins provided the setting for the Little Castle begun in 1612 by Sir Charles Cavendish as a retreat from his principal seat at Welbeck, a few miles away.

The design of the Little Castle was intended to evoke a Norman great tower, which it clearly resembles viewed from a distance, rising sheer from the cliff. The interior continues the impression, with massive round Romanesque vaults in the basement and pointed Gothic ones on the entrance floor. The great windows of the upper floors were designed to give panoramic views across the landscape.

Renishaw Hall
Renishaw Hall

Renishaw Hall – Very close to Mount St Mary’s College.  Renishaw has been in the Sitwell family for nearly 400 years and generations of Sitwells have made their mark on the architecture, gardens and wider estate which comprise Renishaw and so much of what you see on your visit.

The stunning Italianate gardens were laid out in the late 19th Century by Sir George Sitwell. He was the brilliantly eccentric great-grandfather of the current owner Alexandra Sitwell. Walk around the formal garden enjoying the lawns and borders. Take a stroll down the lime avenue to see “The Angel of Fame”. Relax on one of the benches taking time to take in the beauty and tranquility of the gardens.

Venture further afield through the woodland and down to the lakes. Make use of the map to see “the classical temple” and other areas of interest on the way. The lakes are a haven for wildlife, look out for butterflies, dragonflies, and birds. Follow the path round the lake to take in the stunning views, and then up through the woods back to the lawns.

Throughout the season there are many garden highlights such as bluebells, delphiniums, camellias and roses. Please ask at the garden entrance for directions to the seasonal highlights.

The gardens offer a great place to experience the outdoors with plenty to see and enjoy for all ages. With open spaces and woodland for exploring with a family, sculpture, children’s maze and the national collection of Yuccas.

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